crispianmills.com





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Disclaimer

This site is not affiliated with or endorsed by Crispian Mills. This is a not-for-profit site for fans of Crispian Mills. This site does not use or distribute any materials which infringe copyright.


Contact

The administrator of this website can be contacted at gorillaz-unofficial@hotmail.com


Contributions

If you have any additions or corrections to the information presented here, or suggestions for the site, please contact me via the Contact info above.


Latest Updates


31/10/10:- rewrote lack of information section. Things aren't quite as bad as I originally outlined, but still pretty bad. Also added a note about the partial Pi bootleg.
17/10/10:- added some extra info from NME news items, into the timeline. Sources included.
16/10/10:- added some corrections and information submitted by Dan.


General Information about Crispian Mills

If you want to learn more about Crispian, I recommend his wikipedia entry here, and the Kula Shaker entry here, and the short entry on The Jeevas here. Crispian's official Twitter is here.

The information presented on this site assumes the reader is familiar with the information in these articles.


History of the domain crispianmills.com

Crispianmills.com was first registered in mid-late 1999, prior to the end of Kula Shaker. Apparently this registration was made by a fan, who transferred the domain to Crispian in 2000. It was used for his official site during 2000 and until the Jeevas site launched. The site was abandoned and someone forgot to renew the domain. It expired in 2003, and was immediately registered by a domain squatter. The squatter put adverts on the site and held it until 2009 when they let the registration lapse. I acquired the site but did not develop it until now, inspired by the release of the double A-Side single Healing Hands / Be Merciful on Ho Hum Records.


Current Site purpose

This site is dedicated to collecting information on Crispian Mills' 'solo career'. Crispian's 'solo career' is defined here as his musical activities from the date of the announcement of the dissolution of Kula Shaker (18th September 1999) to the date of the announcement of the Jeevas in (26th March 2002).


Site inspiration

During this time there were announcements about musical developments from Crispian, a tour supporting Robbie Williams and a solo tour, released clips of tracks, official website updates etc, but in the end Crispian decided to form The Jeevas and most of the recorded material was shelved. Many fans who followed Crispian through that period, spanning almost two and a half years, were left still wanting to hear the promised material.

Since then, while Crispian's commercial star has waned, interest in the fan community (centred around but not exclusively based in the Jeevas and later Kula Shaker messageboards, also in the wider blogosphere) has, if anything intensified. New fans who got into his work through the Jeevas or the reformed Kula Shaker, hear the odd piece of information or two about that time and go looking for answers, starting the process over again.

Additionally, the story of Crispian's solo career has continued indirectly through a series of further developments related to the time. These have included: release of a very small part of the recorded material being released officially under the Jeevas name, songs from the period being reworked / re-recorded and released by the Jeevas and Kula Shaker, further limited information from the time coming to light from various sources, and the leak of a single large body of recorded material which may be justifiably termed an album.


On the lack of information

Information about Crispian's activities in this period was hard to come by at the time, and now in 2010 it is harder than ever. Even if a fan had dilligently archived every piece of text published on Crispian's official site, on his official forum, and through other news sites and mailing lists, etc, then we would still have a somewhat sketchy picture. But what we have available to us now is a a very much reduced subset of this information.

Crispian's official site is now gone, and archive.org (the internet archive site) has only a small part of the information that was posted there. The original Kula Shaker forum is gone, the official Crispian Mills forum is long gone, as is the Jeevas forum, even the second Kula Shaker forum (2006-2009) is gone. NME.com has removed some relevant old news items, (although many remain, and some of the items mentioned in the timeline below are still accessible). Many fansites have disappeared, including everything from Geocities, and are poorly archived for the most part, (though archive.org does have useful information from them). Many fans from the time have drifted away or lost interest, and even the fading of memories is an issue.

Finally, Crispian himself has given contradictory information about the time, often going against what he himself said during the time period. It is not easy to reconcile many of his Jeevas-onwards comments with other information about the time from other sources. I will not speculate about his motives here.


Timeline

18th September 1999
Crispian announces he is leaving Kula Shaker, and that the band had split up."I have loved my time with Kula Shaker and have experienced more than I could ever have imagined", Mills commented. "We've had an excellent time and been a very tight band, but there comes a time when you want to do your own thing." [source: BBC News http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/452327.stm].
The announcement of the split came barely two weeks after their last live gig together, at the Lowlands Festival in the Netherlands on August 29th. According to a post on an old Kula Shaker news group Kevin Nixon, Kula's manager, had been on record in the press saying the band were 'in debt' (failing to recoup PPA recording and promotion costs maybe), though Crispian has consistently maintained over the years that the split came about because he wanted to work with other people. Compared to K, PPA was a commercial failure and even more so in light of the fact that many in the industry (and the media, at least before the swastika debacle) had predicted the second album would be the breakthrough album.
Crispian also parted ways with his then manager, Kevin Nixon, at the time of the split. The split most likely (major label music contracts being the way they are) left Crispian under contract to Columbia in the UK - Columbia probably neglected to hold the other members to their contracts. Either way, from promotion on the Sony websites it's clear from late 1999 at the very latest, Crispian was signed to Columbia in the UK.Immediately after the split, Crispian went to New York "I spent some time over there really trying to clear my head" [source: Jeevas first press bio, 2002. No longer available online in full] and trying to latch on to some kind of scene, but to no result.

20th November 1999
Crispian sends out a mail to the Kula Shaker mailing list, announcing a forthcoming official site for his work, and speaking of hopefully receiving input from fans about tracks in the future, as they take shape. [source: Lady K's Fairyland http://users.compaqnet.be/fairyland/mills.htm]

16th December 1999
Crispian launches his official website, initially at http://www.sonymusic.co.uk/crispianmills/ but later crispianmills.com was used. The site features a messageboard but no music at the time. [source: Lady K's Fairyland]

20th January 2000
Crispian posted on his official forum thanking fans for their birthday wishes to him. [source: Lady K's Fairyland http://users.compaqnet.be/fairyland/mills.htm]

first week of March 2000
Crispian posts on kulashaker.co.uk "I'm literally two microseconds away from starting rehersals for a brand new musical adventure. I promise I'll make sure you are the first to know about it and invite you into the studio in mid-March. I'll tell you who's playing what, why, where and hopefully get some cool links up as well." [soruce: http://www.nme.com/news/kula-shaker/2866]

Mid-March 2000
Recording for an album begins around Spring 2000.
Mills hired the services of Mark Pritchard (Harmonic 313, Troubleman, Global Communications and many more) and David Brinkworth (Harmonic 33, Farout Recordings) and set off to make a solo album, recording in both Cornwall and on David Gilmour’s house-boat studio in London.

15th June 2000
An official announcement from the Summer Sonic Festival in Japan says Crispian is playing a live set at the festival, to be held that August. [Source: NME.com]. 19th July 2000 His appearance at Summer Sonic was cancelled, the official announcement (published 19th July) being that "recording engagements" would prevent his appearance. [source: Lady K's Fairyland http://users.compaqnet.be/fairyland/mills.htm]

July 20th 2000
An official interview is posted on the Sony site / Kula Shaker's site. Crispian says the album will be finished by the end of the year, and that he hoped to play live by the end of the year. He also says: ""I hope its going forward as opposed to backwards...as a musician you want to be constantly learning and soaking up new experiences, which can then go into the music. I think that this album is heavier and more modern-sounding. I think the main thing is I feel like I'm getting more in touch with what I was really, but never really had the confidence to express. In Kula Shaker I often dressed things up in a bit of a joke. I feel this one is a bit more honest." He also says the Indian sound is "more subtle" but "is still there because I'm still there...it's being used in different ways" [source: Dreamer's website http://www.geocities.com/thedebatesofar see also the NME site http://www.nme.com/news/kula-shaker/3947]

September - October 2000
Crispian answers 3 sets of fan questions on his official site, the title of the features being 'Let Me Ask It' [source: Dreamer's website http://www.geocities.com/thedebatesofar]

late September 2000
The Support for Robbie Williams' UK arena tour pulls out at the last minute and it is announced Crispian will step in to fill the gap. The initial press release from Sony just states that he has 'put together a live band', not that the band has a name. The press release states "The past year has seen Crispian recording his debut solo album for Columbia Records." and Crispian says "“I was literally finishing the new album when the invitation came through to play with Robbie." The band was announced as being Mark Pritchard (formerly of Global Communication), Clive Deamer (formerly drummer for Roni Size and Portishead) and Kim Khahn (another session musician, later played for Melanie C amongst others) on bass. [source: Dreamer's website http://www.geocities.com/thedebatesofar ]

For more information on Pi, see the 'What was Pi?' section below.

September 2000
Speaking to the NME, Crispian says the sound of the 2000 recordings as "tougher sounding with harder beats, moving on from what I did with Kula Shaker", and says he is looking towards early 2001 for the album release. [http://www.nme.com/news/kula-shaker/1917]

October 2000
Just before the first Pi live dates (as support), the first clip of recorded work from Crispian is posted on his official site. The track is the opening 46 seconds of a song titled 'Antimaterial'.

October - November 2000
Crispian plays the following dates supporting Robbie Williams. The band including Crispian is billed as 'Pi' at the appearances, the first appearance of this name. The initial press release did not mention the name Pi. For more on the nature of Pi in connection with Crispian, see below.
OCTOBER
Birmingham NEC 9th, 12th, 13th, 14th
Glasgow SECC 16th, 17th, 18th
Newcastle Arena 20th, 21st
Manchester Arena 23rd, 24th, 26th, 27th, 28th
London Docklands Arena 30th, 31st
NOVEMBER
London Docklands Arena 1st, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th

10th November 2000
NME reports that a spokesperson for Crispian has said he has finished his solo album, and that a single from it will be released in February or March next year. The spokesperson also says to NMe about the album:- "It's still got the Indian influences, but it's a more a cross between Kula Shaker stuff and something a bit more Portishead-y or Roni Size-ish. One track's a bit like The Chemical Brothers. It's got a dancey vibe, but there's still some indie stuff on there." [source: http://www.nme.com/news/kula-shaker/5180 ]

2nd December 2000
NME.com reports on this day:- "Forty-six seconds of 'Anti-Material', his first solo work since he split the band in 1999, has been posted 'on the internet', "odds on favourite (it) is 'Anti-Material'" [to be the single]. 'Mills is also said to have completed mastering his forthcoming album, though no release has yet been set' states the article. 'A spokesperson for Mills could not be reached at press time.' it notes.

December 2000
Crispian then goes on to play club dates with the band (the original idea had been club dates until the Robbie tour slot came up). The band is billed as 'Pi' again for these.
Glasgow, King Tuts (December 7)
Manchester, Hop & Grape (8)
Birmingham, Academy (9)
Portsmouth, Wedgewood Rooms (11)
Leicester, Charlotte (12)
Bristol, Fleece & Firkin (13)
Leeds, Cockpit (15)
Sheffield, Leadmill (16)
Oxford, Zodiac (17)
Reviews from fans submitted to the official Crispian Mills site were posted on the site. [later preserved on Dreamer's site http://www.geocities.com/thedebatesofar] They reveal which songs were played on the dates. No complete live bootleg is known from any Pi shows, though there is a very poor quality version of Antimaterial that is known to exist, along with a version of Tattva. For the club dates, Mark Pritchard did a DJ set before the shows. There were no new songs played at the club dates that weren't played on the arena tour. A typical setlist on the club dates was:-

Silver Apples
Hurry On Sundown
One Louder
Modern Science
The Knight And The Dragon
Knight On The Town
Saddest Of All Keys
Antimaterial
Tattva
The Procession At Angkor Wat
Untitled / Pop Song (not two songs, just referred to as different things on setlists etc.)
Hush
-
DNA (an instrumental)
Govinda

However there was another song called Can't Help Breaking Down (according to the setlist on the archive of official Crispian Mills website) played at some of the Pi shows instead of Saddest Of All Keys.

Hurry On Sundown is a Hawkwind cover, previously played live and recorded by Kula Shaker, released as a B-Side to the single Sound Of Drums. Hush is a Joe South previously played live and recorded by Kula Shaker, released as a single. Tattva, Govinda and Knight On The Town are Kula Shaker songs.

10th January 2001
Crispian sent a mailout talking about the Lunar eclipse of 9th January and bigging up panchang.com [source: NME.com]

May 2001
Crispian posts on his website that the album is completed and sounds "real real pretty", Crispian also revealed the following tracks were completed that hadn't featured on the tour [source: http://www.nme.com/news/kula-shaker/7681 , report dated May 8th 2001] . The NME article also notes that it is expected material will appear on the website from June. The new tracks not heard on the tour were stated to be:-
Californian Blue
Healing Hands
Follow Your Heart
Teenage Breakdown

Early-mid 2001
Clips from more tracks were uploaded to Crispianmills.com after the first clip, which was Antimaterial. Clips from the intros to Modern Science and The Procession Of Angkor Wat were posted, which didn't have much music and were clips from films. Also a clip of Be Merciful was posted, as was a 30 second instrumental clip from Silver Apples.

Mid 2001
Columbia (i.e. 'Sony') (specifically their managing director in the UK) pressured Mills for 'singles' (a lot of the material was fairly out there - in any case the director felt there weren't sufficient singles to sell the album). Crispian was ultimately unwilling to meet these demands, though did at first attempt some re-recording and remixing. He goes back to his old manager Kevin Nixon, who becomes his manager once more. Kevin Nixon brokers a deal that allows Crispian to leave Columbia. The details of the deal are not disclosed. [source: Undertheradar magazine #10 interview with Crispian Mills]

Late 2001
Crispian begins working on new recordings with producer Mark 'Duck' Blackwell.

Much material is recorded during this time, including the tracks:-

One Louder
Red
Once Upon A Time In America
song Of Innocence
Teenage Breakdown
Stoned Love
Love Is Automatic
Crooked Lines
Thank Your Parents
It's Not What You Do
Untitled (instrumental) - not to be confused with the untitled song from the Pi tour, which wasn't an instrumental.

Was an album recorded during this time? See the section below for more details.

13th December 2001
A mailout from the Crispian Mills website contained links to clips of Love Is Automatic, One Louder and Teenage Breakdown (versions as in the recording above). Crispian announced that he had scrapped the original album at some point in 2001. The clips were stated to be 'clues as to what you can expect' and that more would appear. No more ever appeared. Crispian also addressed the email to 'Citizens Of Oz' - the 11 track recording contains linking clips referencing Oz.

Late 2001 / early 2002 before 26th March 2002
This period is the subject of some conjecture.
The Jeevas came together very quickly in either late 2001 or early 2002.
In the first Jeevas official press biography, it was stated that they had 'four weeks of rehearsals, then went and recorded the album in 3 weeks flat'
It appears very possible that at the time of the December mailout, Crispian had not yet decided that a band called The Jeevas would be his next vehicle.
The announcement / mailout was launched through his website, and 'Let Me Ask It' was stated to be starting up again through his site.
An album's worth of material, possibly even a whole album, had been completed by the end of 2001.
One possibility is that the Andy and Dan were recruited as live band members to tour a Crispian solo album, and that their rehearsals went so well that Crispian decided to form a band instead and to re-record the album fairly raw sounding.
It's possible that Andy and / or Dan contributed to the 'second solo album'. The two were members of the band Straw along with Mark 'Duck' Blackwell, and Straw split up in 2001. Andy is also Kevin Nixon's son.

26th march 2002
The Jeevas officially announced to the world - official website launched in early April and initial UK tourdates announced around the same time.


What was Pi?

As stated in the timeline above, Pi was the name that Crispian and his band were billed as for the Robbie Williams tour and on his own tour in December 2000.
Crispian made an informative post about Pi on his website about Pi. It is reproduced below in full:-
"WHAT IS PI?
: Crispian; “Different people from different musical backgrounds.
I put the group together to make some recordings and see what happened.
We did'nt even talk about playing live together until much later.
I first met Mark Pritchard in the spring of 2000 via ace drummer Andy Gangadeen. I knew he was in Jedi Knights and had heard their name before. I worked on a track with The Prodigy for FAT OF THE LAND which featured sampled beats from a Jedi Knights tune, so there was already a connection there, sort of! We hit it off immediately and I liked a lot of his music. It was all very diverse and unpredictable. Like any self respecting DJ he has an amazing record collection of obscure, groovy, weird, ambient, modern, ancient, trippy, funny, funky heavy tunes and a good knowledge of tasty soundtrack music.
Clive Deamer was somebody I admired from PORTISHEAD and RONI SIZE.
Kim Khahn literally strolled out of the Australian outback looking for a gig and luckily, she fitted in really well.
I was watching the film PI, at the time and thought that a symbol would be better than a band name. The film is about a genius mathematician who is convinced there is a pattern that connects all life, something that will explain everything from déjà vu, to fluctuations in the stock market, to the key to the mysteries of the universe, God and beyond. Some of the film is quite funny actually, although the hero is a hideous migrane sufferer and ends up having a nightmare about drilling a hole through his head!! Having agreed the name we set about rehearsing some of the recordings to play them live and see how they worked. The plan was to gig for a while, and then go back into the studio and record again, also having the option of changing any of the music after having played it all in front of an audience. PI is not an" experiment ", nor is it a "project ", those labels have the tendency to sound so dull and pompous ! It's just an experimental project..... it's about people wanting to make some good music and pushing each other's imaginations............."


The Pi Bootleg

Worth mentioning is a partial bootleg of a Pi show, rumoured to be from one of the Robbie Williams support dates. The bootleg includes only 3 tracks, Silver Apples, Antimaterial, and One Louder. The recording is of low quality even considering that it is an audience recording, and most of the lyrics are not audible on the tracks. Nevertheless, it gives a invaluable insight into the Pi sound as it is the only live recording known from the time.


How many solo albums did Crispian record? None, one, two, etc?

Partly the answer to this question depends on how you define an album. If an album has to be a commercially released work, then of course Crispian released no solo albums. However, if we think of an album (or 'studio album') as a more or less cohesive body of tracks, regarded as a complete piece by its creator, and intended for release, then the question becomes more interesting. If we use this definition then it is arguable that Crispian recorded a solo album, perhaps even two separate solo albums.

During his 'solo period', Crispian recorded extensively. Two periods of recording can be distinguished.

Whilst signed to Sony, Crispian recorded with Mark Pritchard (Harmonic 313, Troubleman, Global Communications and many more) and David Brinkworth (Harmonic 33, Farout Recordings) recording in both Cornwall and on David Gilmour’s house-boat studio in London. There is no evidence of any recording not produced by Mark Pritchard during this time.

After Crispian left Sony, Crispian recorded with Mark 'Duck' Blackwell as producer.

How much material was recorded, and in what state were the recordings?

To an extent this is a matter of conjecture, but some things can reasonably be inferred.

Considering the Sony era,
There were extensive recording sessions throughout most of 2000. At least 9 or 10 tracks were written (those played by Pi); an unknown further number existed.
In December 2000, NME stated (apparently based on statements on Crispian's website) that the album had been mastered. Crispian stated he was just finishing the album when the call came in to support Robbie Williams on the autumn 2000 tourdates. The album was intended to be finished by the end of 2000, according to statements in 2000.
Also the clip of Antimaterial (and the other Sony era clips) sound completely produced.
Was an album completed by the end of 2000? It's not possible to say exactly from the publicly available information, but it seems there is a possibility. Based on the undertheradar magazine interview, Crispian had a dispute about the material with Sony, who wanted 'singles'. So it seems possible that a version of the album was completed by the end of 2000, and then recording continued on into 2001 to meet label demands.
Alternatively, disregarding the NME report from December 2000, it may be that the album had not been completed in any way in 2000 and that Crispian himself felt that additional recording in 2001 was necessary, and that the dispute with the record company only emerged in full later. This would be consistent with his statement about Pi (date unknown) that they wanted to have the option of recording again after having played live.
However, in May 2001, Crispian himself posted that the album was finished, on his website, while he was still signed to Sony.
So either there were several versions of an album, with one or other being definitive, or just one - but either way, at the time, Crispian felt he had recorded an album. The undertheradar interview does indicate that Crispian did try to take some (musical) measures to appease the record company (i.e. further recording).
Lastly, a Ho Hum Records official also indicated that an entire 'album' (to quote) of material had been recorded with Mark Pritchard, in 2010, on the website of Ho Hum records.
It seems undeniable that Crispian felt he had completed album (which perhaps went through some revision) during the Sony era.
Even setting the album issue to one side, it's clear that over an album's worth of material was professionally recorded and considered, at that time, fit for release, by Crispian.
Only the record company's intervention prevented an album release utilising already-recorded material.
In 2010, on the occasion of the release of the single Healing Hands / Be Merciful, Crispian told Classic Rock magazine that the Sony era sessions has not yielded enough material for an album, and that the two songs on the single were the best tracks.

Considering the post-Sony era,
Recordings during this time were produced by Mark 'Duck' Blackwell, formerly of Straw.
In his December 2001 mailout, Crispian stated that he had at some point in 2001 decided to scrap all previously recorded material and record afresh. Three clips were offered as 'clues as to what to expect' (Teenage Breakdown, Love Is Automatic, One Louder, all 'second solo album' versions).
With the release of the One Louder single and It's Not What You Do, as well as statements about 1234's brief recording sessions (see timeline above) it gradually became apparent to fans throughout 2002 and 2003 that there had been some quite substantial recording sessions after Crispian left Sony, and before the 1234 jeevas album sessions.
But how much material had been recorded? Had a whole album been recorded?
The key piece of evidence, which also provides material for severalduring of the songs in the song list, is a leaked collection of tracks from these sessions. This collection I have referred to on this page as the 'second solo album', but of course it is up to the reader whether they are convinced that this can be thought of as an album.
How did this 'second solo album' leak? All known leaks seem to be traceable back to a single source, a poster on the forum of a British electronic music act. This poster later claimed to have received the album from Crispian himself. The poster also claimed the material did constitute an album, and that it had the name 'Let Me Have It'. How extensively the poster distributed the album is not known, but probably not that extensively since all leaks seem to link back to him. He had at least given it to several other members of the forum on the certain band's website. A google search lead a Crispian / Kula Shaker fan to the site, and he simply asked for the album, and was given it. The initial poster later claimed not to have known that the album was not released. The fan who had previously posted a thread asking for Crispian's solo album, returned to the Kula Shaker forum and the 'second solo album' was distributed to a very small number of other fans, perhaps only 1 or 2, before the fan got scared and wouldn't share it anymore. Thus checked for the moment, the leak spread no further, and requests for the album by fans who returned to the British electronic act's forum were turned down. But a long time passed, and eventually another fan got lucky simply by asking for the album on the electronic act's forum again, this time someone else (other than the original leaker) supplied the album. This fan (apparently, since the next leak came shortly after) made a compilation of a lot of Crispian Kula and Jeevas material, mixing in some of the 'second solo album', and posted it on the Kula Shaker forum where it was widely downloaded and shared on filesharing networks. Slightly later, the whole 'second solo album' was posted on the Kula Shaker forums but it was quickly deleted, with the admin now aware of the leak and determined to try and stop it.
So much for the history of the leak, what is the nature of the material?
The material consists of 11 tracks, all originals and unreleased in full at the time, sounding professionally recorded and mixed, and fully produced. The tracklisting can be found in the timeline above.
Could this collection have been intended as an album?
Here are some reasons for thinking so, none form a convincing case alone.
The tracks are full arrangements and sound completely produced, unlike other tracks Crispian has referred to as demoes. One of the tracks, Once Upon A Time In America, was even released as an album track on the Jeevas album 1234 with only one minor vocal change.
The tracks flow like an album. They are often mixed together. There is also a wizard of Oz theme running through the tracklisting, with dialogue interspersed at four key places. (Crispian referred to fans as 'children of Oz' in the December 2001 mailout)
The original leaker who allegedly received it from Crispian himself, considered it to be an album.
There is a explanation consistent with the facts (e.g. Crispian's statement in December 2001, and the statement about the timescale of the Jeevas rehearsals and live shows) as to how Crispian may have finished what he considered to be a finished album in 2001, yet still recorded 1234 with The Jeevas in early 2002 (see the timeline above).
Crispian has referred to the 'second solo album' as a collection of demoes recorded in 2001, in an email to a fan on the subject


The proposed album title

If an album had been released, it would almost certainly have been called 'Let Me Have It'. This was stated to be the album title by multiple sources, and Crispian's semi-regular fan Q&As (started late 2000, still referred to by the same title in December 2001) were called 'Let Me Ask It'. NME spoke to Crispian in September 2000 and he told them the working title was 'Let Me Have It' [http://www.nme.com/news/kula-shaker/1917]. No other title has ever been mentioned or even rumoured in connection with albums or proposed albums from Crispian's 'solo period'. Finally, as noted above, the original source for the leaked 'second solo album' referred to it as Let Me Have It.


Complete list of known solo tracks with known information

These are all the tracks known from Crispian's solo period, some from clips, some from having been played live, a couple by name only.

In the cases of songs not even heard ('Follow Your Heart' and 'Californian blue' it's not even possible to be sure that these aren't re-titlings or different versions of other songs on the list).

There is a particular controversy around the tracks 'Can't Help Breaking Down' and 'Saddest Of All Keys'. According to old Pi setlists, archived on crispianmills.com, these tracks were never played at the same Pi show, and were the only new tracks that varied in the set. So it may be that they are just different names for the same track (or maybe not). Further adding to the mystery is that 'Can't Help Breaking Down' might be related (just going by the title alone) to 'Teeange Breakdown', although Crispian's statement naming 4 post-tour recorded songs, in 2001, names Teenage Breakdown as a song not heard live.

SILVER APPLES
Played at all the Pi live dates, as the set opener. A clip from the track was uploaded to Crispian's website in 2001, it was a 30-second clip featuring only instrumental parts of the song, so presumably a full version exists. Later recorded and played live by The Jeevas.
Release / availability:
A 30-second clip from the Sony era was uploaded to the Crispian Mills site whilst Crispian was still signed to Sony. A version was recorded duing the Jeevas 1234 album sessions and is available on their album 1234, released in 2002. This version is, in line with all the 1234 tracks, more rough and ready and less produced.
Another version, titled Silver Apples (Fish People Remix) was released as a B-Side to the Jeevas single 'Have You Ever Seen The Rain?', released in 2002. This was stated on the Jeevas website and on the single sleeve as being remixed by Mark Pritchard with Dave Brinkworth. This version however does not seem to share any parts with the 1234 version, and includes new vocals and some alternate lyrics. Interestingly, some of the parts on this track sound very close (if not identical) to parts on the 30-second Sony era clip, though this clearly not the exact same track as the Sony version. No Sony credit or mention is included in the single credits, unlike in the case of the single Healing Hands / Be Merciful, when Sony was mentioned.

ONE LOUDER
Played at all the Pi live dates (so presumably a Sony-era recorded version exists?). Also appears on the 'second solo album'. Released as the lead track under the Jeevas name and played live very occasionally (maybe only a few times) by The Jeevas.
Release / availability:
Nothing of the Sony era version has been released.
One Louder appears on the 'second solo album' as the first track.
A short clip (approx 30 seconds) was released on the web in 2001, by Crispian through a mailout to his mailing list. The track in its 'second solo album version' was released as the lead track on a 3-track single/EP released in Japan only, under the name 'One Louder' by The Jeevas', featuring Jeevas artwork (band shots), as well as two other tracks from the 'second solo album'. However, note that the version on the One Louder single / EP is a slight edit (approx 1 minute lost) of the version on the 'second solo album'. Crispian was not entirely happy about this single (going by comments to a Japanese magazine, and comments to fans presenting him it to sign in 2002) but it appears that Sony Japan applied pressure to get a release out before The Jeevas' appearance at Fuji Rock 2002. This material was all that was readily available, or all that Crispian was prepared to give up at the time. It also appears he only played the track live with The Jeevas only a very few times, at least once outside Japan (Manchester Night and Day cafe show).
On the subject of the One Louder single, it's interesting to note that despite Crispian's general discomfort over the release, two tracks from the 'second solo album' (i.e. not re-recorded) were selected as B-Sides to UK Jeevas releases, where the band had more autonomy (Stoned Love from the One Louder single itself, also It's Not What You Do).

MODERN SCIENCE
Played at all the Pi live dates (so presumably a Sony-era recorded version exists?). Also a 30 second web clip from the track was released during the Sony era. The clip is almost entirely dialogue, a sample from the movie The Planet Of The Apes followed by what is apparently a quote from the book The Naked Ape, about how when man stood upright his hands were free to use weapons.
Release / availability:
Only the short 30 second web clip above was released.
The track did not appear on the 'second solo album' nor was it recorded by The Jeevas.

THE KNIGHT AND THE DRAGON
Played at all the Pi live dates (so presumably a Sony-era recorded version exists?). Has lyrics about a dragon, at least in part.
Release / availability:
No clips or versions of any kind have been released.
The track did not appear on the 'second solo album' nor was it recorded by The Jeevas.

SADDEST OF ALL KEYS
Played at Pi dates except where Can't Help Breaking Down was played (so presumably a Sony-era recorded version exists?).
Release / availability:
No clips or versions of any kind have been released.
The track did not appear on the 'second solo album' nor was it recorded by The Jeevas.

ANTIMATERIAL
Played at all the Pi live dates and a recorded Sony-era version exists, going by the 46-second released clip. Has lyrics on a similar theme to Tattva, according to reports from the Pi live dates. Was apparently odds on favourite, in late 2000, to be the first single from a proposed solo album, according to Crispian.
Release / availability:
A 46-second clip from the track was released, through Crispian's website.
A poor quality live version appears on a (partial) Pi live bootleg.
Was alleged by various sources, including the NME and a comment on Crispian's website, to be the likely choice of single from the album, at least initially.
The track did not appear on the 'second solo album' nor was it recorded by The Jeevas.
However, there are strong similarities between the track Antimaterial and the track Red, with some arguing they should be seen as the same track (albeit with some major differences including a completely different lyric).

THE PROCESSION AT ANGKOR WAT
Played at all the Pi live dates (so presumably a Sony-era recorded version exists?). The song was a long instrumental. Crispian said on his website in answer to a fan question, in late 2000, that it was one of two instrumentals 'on the album' along with DNA and "Angkor Wat has Harpsicord all over it and floats along like the milky way". Also a 30 second web clip from the track was released during the Sony era. The clip is almost entirely dialogue, a sample from an episode of 'Kung Fu' in which an older blind teacher / master teaches a child that blindness is not a barrier to living a full life.
Release / availability:
Only the short 30 second web clip above was released.
The track did not appear on the 'second solo album' nor was it recorded by The Jeevas.

UNTITLED / POP SONG
Played at all the Pi live dates (so presumably a Sony-era recorded version exists?).
Release / availability:
No clips or versions of any kind have been released.
The track did not appear on the 'second solo album' nor was it recorded by The Jeevas.

CAN'T HELP BREAKING DOWN
Played at some Pi dates instead of Saddest Of All Keys (so presumably a Sony-era recorded version exists?). However, see note above about the Saddest Of All Keys / Can't Help Breaking Down mystery.
Release / availability:
No clips or versions of any kind have been released.
The track did not appear on the 'second solo album' nor was it recorded by The Jeevas.

DNA
Played at all the Pi live dates (so presumably a Sony-era recorded version exists?). This song is an instrumental. Crispian said on his website in answer to a fan question, in late 2000, that it was one of two instrumentals 'on the album' along with The Procession At Angkor Wat. He also said "DNA is an apocalyptic, beat driven slice of the Jedi at his best... It has an amazing choir performance that was inspired by the end sequence to " 2001: A space Odyessy ". Ideas often materialise like that; someone says something or you meet somebody and all of a sudden, your're inspired. In this case it was the appearence of my new DVD collection that included the Kubrick 2001. We were like; " Yea, let's do something like that ! Open the f***'ing pod bay doors HAL, we're comin' in !"
Release / availability:
No clips or versions of any kind have been released.
The track did not appear on the 'second solo album' nor was it recorded by The Jeevas.

CALIFORNIAN BLUE
Mentioned by name in an early 2001 post-Pi tour posting on Crispian's site, as an additional track recorded but not played live.
Release / availability:
No clips or versions of any kind have been released.
The track did not appear on the 'second solo album' nor was it recorded by The Jeevas.

HEALING HANDS
Mentioned by name in an early 2001 post-Pi tour posting on Crispian's site, as an additional track recorded but not played live.
Release / availability:
The Jeevas recorded a version for their second album Cowboys & Indians, and it was released on that album in 2003. The Sony era version was finally released as a single in September 2010.

FOLLOW YOUR HEART
Mentioned by name in an early 2001 post-Pi tour posting on Crispian's site, as an additional track recorded but not played live.
Release / availability:
No clips or versions of any kind have been released.
The track did not appear on the 'second solo album' nor was it recorded by The Jeevas.
However the line 'follow your heart' sounds close to a line in Song of Innocence, so there is a remote possibility that this song is related to Song Of Innocence.

TEENAGE BREAKDOWN
Mentioned by name in an early 2001 post-Pi tour posting on Crispian's site, as an additional track recorded but not played live. Also appears on the 'second solo album' in another version. Also recorded by The Jeevas for their album 1234, and an acoustic demo of the track has also been released.
Release / availability:
Nothing of the Sony-era version has been released.
A 30 second clip of the 'second solo album' version was released by Crispian on the web in 2001, when he emailed his mailing list.
The 'second solo album' version has not been officially released in full but has had some circulation amongst fans after the 'second solo album' leaked.
The Jeevas recorded a version during the 1234 sessions, more rough and less produced than the 'second solo album' version, and this was released on 1234 in 2002.
An acoustic demo of the track (recording date unknown) was released as a B-side to the Japanese version of the Jeevas single 'Once Upon A Time In America' and as a B-Side on the 7" format of the UK release of the Jeevas single 'Virginia'.

BE MERCIFUL
Known first from a clip released on Crispian's website during 2001. This was the longest by far of the clips released.
Release/availability:-
The full Sony-era version of the track was finally released in September 2010 on as the B-Side of (or as a double A-side with) the Sony-era version of Healing Hands. Previously, only 1:16 of the track (roughly, the first verse and chorus, minus the intro, and with the end of the track tagged on at the end) was available, having been released on Crispian's website in 2001.
The song was later revived by Kula Shaker, in their second incarnation 2004-2010. The very first airing of a Kula shaker version was the live in session version played as one of the tracks recorded for the documentary Faith & Music, about Crispians.. faith and his music. This version had an extra outro not present on the Sony-era version, and was a full band recording as opposed to the more acoustic feel of the Sony-era recording. The song went on to become a staple in the band's live sets and was played both as a full band version with outro, as well as as a Crispian-only version without outro (variously on piano, acoustic guitar, electric guitar, etc). The track was finally given an official release on the band's iTunes live in London digital-only EP release (this version was a 'Crispian solo' version of the track)

RED
Appears on the 'second solo album'. Released as the track under the Jeevas name as a B-Side to the 'One Louder' release, released in Japan only.
Release/availability:-
Appears on the 'second solo album' which has had some circulation amongst fans since its leak.
However it is more readily available on the 'One Louder' single, released in Japan only in 2002. See the comments on the 'One Louder' release for more details on this single release.
However, there are strong similarities between the track Antimaterial and the track Red, with some arguing they should be seen as the same track (albeit with some major differences including a completely different lyric).
Not played live by The Jeevas, unlike the other two songs on the 'One Louder' single.

ONCE UPON A TIME IN AMERICA
Appears on the 'second solo album'. Also appears on The Jeevas album 1234, with a slight difference.
Release/availability:-
Appears on the 'second solo album' which has had some circulation amongst fans since its leak.
The track was included on the Jeevas album 1234, and it appears to be identical to the version on the 'second solo album' (unlike many other Jeevas versions, including all those recorded for 1234, which were re-recorded. Perhaps Crispian felt he couldn't top this version), except that Crispian sings the lyric 'land of the freak' not 'land of the free'.
Also available in acoustic demo form (also with the 'land of the freak' lyrics) as a bonus track on the Japanese version of The Jeevas album 1234, and as a B-Side to the UK version of The Jeevas single 'Once Upon A Time In America'.

SONG OF INNOCENCE
Appears on the 'second solo album'
Release/availability:-
Appears on the 'second solo album' which has had some circulation amongst fans since its leak.
The track was demoed by Kula shaker for their fourth album Pilgrim's Progress (though the demo sounds almost like Crispian alone, an acoustic version) and the demo appears on the bonus CD that comes with the deluxe edition of the album. The song is titled 'Let It In' on this CD, and has a few minor lyric changes, but apart from that is clearly the same song.

STONED LOVE.
Appears on the 'second solo album' and later revived during the Jeevas era, in two forms.
Release / availability:-
Appears on the 'second solo album' which has had some circulation amongst fans since its leak.
However it is more readily available on the 'One Louder' single, released in Japan only in 2002. See the comments on the 'One Louder' release for more details on this single release.
This version of the track was also released on the B-Side to the UK version of the Jeevas single Virginia, the only one of the three tracks on the One Louder single to get a commercial release elsewhere.
The Jeevas also later recorded a new version for their second album Cowboys & Indians, and this was released on that album in 2003.

LOVE IS AUTOMATIC
Appears on the 'second solo album'
Release / availability:-
About 60 seconds of the song, including one full chorus, was released on the web in December 2001 by Crispian. Appears on the 'second solo album' which has had some circulation amongst fans since its leak. Not recorded or revived by The Jeevas or Kula Shaker.

CROOKED LINES
Appears on the 'second solo album', later partially revived by Kula Shaker.
Release / availability:-
The chorus of the song was incorporated into the Kula Shaker song 'Witches & Wine'. This was first played live in 2008, then later demoed for Kula Shaker's fourth album (though the demo sounds almost like Crispian alone, an acoustic version) and the demo appears on the bonus CD that comes with the deluxe edition of the album.

THANK YOUR PARENTS
aka 'Scary Parents' (the former is the 'second solo album' title, the latter the title as released by The Jeevas).
Release / availability:-
Appears on the 'second solo album' which has had some circulation amongst fans since its leak.
Later re-recorded by The Jeevas for the album 1234.

IT'S NOT WHAT YOU DO
Appears on the 'second solo album', though released later as a Jeevas B-Side
Release / availability:-
Appears on the 'second solo album' which has had some circulation amongst fans since its leak.
However, the track was also released in the same form (i.e. not re-recorded) on the B-Side to the Jeevas single 'Ghost (Cowboys In The Movies)'. The sleevenotes describe it as a 'an album contender that failed to make the cut' though this version at least predates the 1234 sessions and there is no later version known, nor was this track played live by The Jeevas.

UNTITLED INSTRUMENTAL
Appears on the 'second solo album' as a bonus track after It's Not What You Do.
Release / availability:-
Appears on the 'second solo album' which has had some circulation amongst fans since its leak.


Tracks at one time or other rumoured to be solo tracks, now presumed to be false

Beware The Beast Man
Presumably a mis-titling of the Modern Science 30-second clip, which contains this phrase in its dialogue sample.

The New Student
Presumably a mis-titling of the 30-second clip of The Procession Of Angkor Wat, which contains this phrase in its dialogue sample.

Planet Of The Apes
Presumably a mis-titling of the Modern Science clip, which contains dialogue from the movie Planet Of The Apes.






Thanks to

Dan, for several valuable corrections and contributions.